Entries by Peter Bradbury (Dramaturge)

A Queer Reading of Twelfth Night

“Queer has been defined theoretically as ‘whatever is at odds with the normal, the legitimate, the dominant …, as that which is ‘not yet conscious’ …; as the very status of unthinkability’.” Clara Bradbury Rance, Lesbian Cinema After Queer Throry, Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press, 2019, p.10 In my post on this website, Master-Mistress: Love, gender […]

YOU AND THOU: PLAYING WITH STATUS IN TWELFTH NIGHT

The use of pronouns might seem random in Shakespeare’s plays, and it is sometimes, perhaps often, the case that usage depends on the actor or prompt who wrote down or marked the original script. However, it is useful to note that there were subtle class and social distinctions between apparently ordinary or neutral forms of […]

Twelfth Night: A Plague on Both Your Houses

In the critical literature on Twelfth Night, as far as I can tell from a survey of reading lists and the titles and contents of books and articles, there is very little about the plague. Critics refer of course to Olivia’s comment that falling in love can be as quick as catching the plague; but […]

Editions and Critical Resources

Editions There are many editions of Twelfth Night and what you choose will depend on the content you want and the format. I tend to work with three editions: firstly, the Arden 3rd Series, which is the most scholarly and provides a comprehensive gloss on words, phrases and editorial choices; secondly, the Arden Performance Edition […]

Meet Peter Bradbury: Our Dramaturge.

Meet our dramaturge, Peter Bradbury. Welcome to the Curtain Theatre video blog where we will bring you backstage to meet the production crew, designers and actors to share in some of the fun we are having with “Twelfth Night”. In this video we will introduce you to our dramaturge, Peter Bradbury.  

The Language of Merry Wives

As a visual spectacle, The Merry Wives of Windsor is little more than knockabout comedy. It ranges from farce to the subtle humor of gesture. It’s good knockabout, mind you, and despite the preposterous improbability of the plot it is vastly entertaining. Its theater is very domestic and in this respect it can be linked […]